Report: Applying Multi-Stakeholder Internet Governance to Online Content Management

Between 2019 and 2021 one of my main projects has been a Knight Foundation funded project working with the R Street Institute on translating the ethos and structure of multistakeholder governance from the Internet Governance space to the Speech Governance (of Content Policy) space. In September 2021 our report, written with Chris Riley, finally came…

Link: Brookings – Trump deplatforming decision highlights the impotence of Facebook’s Oversight Board

For Brookings Institution’s TechTank, I wrote a post about the (in)decision of the Facebook Oversight Board on deplatforming former President Trump. Beyond the specifics on the decision, this builds on my previous work on this, the overview of and general  takeaways from the Facebook Oversight Board. I make some very pointed critiques of the Board, Facebook and…

Link: Brookings – Facebook’s Oversight Board makes an imperfect case for private governance

For Brookings Institution’s TechTank, I wrote an overview of and takeaways from the Facebook Oversight Board. I was fortunate to be part of one of its expert meetings in August 2019, and I focused most of my comments while there on the private governance aspect of the process. In this piece I recreate the journey…

Webinar: Internet in the Time of Crisis

On August 14th, I was invited to talk about how the Internet worked during prolonged crisis, in a webinar put together by the Internet Law and Policy Foundry and ISOC-DC. Joining an all-star cast of lawyers, technical experts and academics, we talked about everything from infrastructure to social media platforms. A recording of the webinar…

Facebook’s Oversight Board Can’t Intervene, So Stop Asking

This post originally appeared on Techdirt with the title Facebook’s Oversight Board Can’t Intervene, So Stop Asking: As Facebook employees stage a digital walk-out and make their thoughts known about the social media giant’s choice to not intervene in any way on “political posts”, especially those of President Donald Trump, some have called for the newly-created Oversight Board to step up…

An in-depth look at Facebook’s Oversight Board

This post originally appeared on the Georgia Tech School of Public Policy’s Internet Governance Project blog titled: Facebook’s Oversight Board: A toothless Supreme Court? A week and a half ago Facebook released its final charter for the Oversight Board it intends to create to tackle its content moderation problems. The charter spells out exactly how it would work,…

Perspectives on Internet Governance: The case for the Human Element

Multistakeholder Internet governance institutions are not being properly studied. Research focuses primarily on structure, which has its own set of concerns and limitations, but it overlooks the human element, which may play a vital role in shaping these institutions. The human element, which encompasses the human actors and their networks, is potentially important because of both the way the institutions themselves function internally to promote and highlight individuals, and the effect these institutions have on the participants. While this may sound interesting, a straightforward question emerges as to why this has not yet been studied. Two explanations of why this has not been the case so far cover both the substantive environment and its inherent complexities, and the theoretical biases inherent in the most prevalent lens used to study these institutions, borrowed from a related but entirely different area of research, democratic decision-making. Based on these points, before value is added to this role, it is paramount to try and uncover whether the human element has any substantial impact in the shaping and ongoing functioning of multistakeholder institutions on par with structure, and my upcoming dissertation tackles this issue.